Posts tagged ‘Irish’

December 30, 2013

Islam to become Ireland’s second religion by 2043

Source: Irish Independent

The revelation came as construction work is expected to begin next year on Ireland’s largest mosque.

The Clongriffin centre, on Dublin’s northside, will be the largest Islamic religious complex in the State and will also boast a major cultural centre.

An Bord Pleanala earlier this year granted planning permission for the three-storey complex, which is earmarked for a six-acre site owned by developer Gerry Gannon.

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November 29, 2013

Irish troops fired on by Syrian rebel units

Source: Irish Times

Irish troops serving on the United Nations mission in Syria have come under fire from anti-government armed forces, with a number of their vehicles damaged in a morning ambush.

It is the first time Irish troops have been fired on in Syria and the first occasion an Irish vehicle carrying troops has been hit on any UN mission in recent memory.

While no serious injuries were reported, the attack will likely lead to an escalation in security measures for the Irish in the Golan Heights region.

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November 11, 2013

Cork’s reaction to the Muslim veil

Source: Irish Examiner

By Rita de Brun

There are good intentions behind calls to ban the veil: a commendable wish to halt the liberty-curtailing husbands, fathers, uncles, brothers and religious leaders who coerce women to conceal their faces in public. But there’s flawed thinking there as well, a naivety, as not all who wear veils are forced to do so, and a blanket ban denies Muslim women the basic human right to dress as they choose, and to express themselves, their beliefs and their religion as they see fit.

In some countries in which the veil has been banned, there has been a rise in hate crimes against Muslims. Figures released by the National Observatory of Islamophobia show that in 2011 the number of anti-Muslim attacks in France rose by 34% on 2010 — the year in which the ‘burqa ban’ was introduced.

Until recently, I’d have found it hard to believe that any woman would wear a burqa or niqab by choice, but that all changed when I donned the garb and took a stroll around Cork.

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November 27, 2012

Dublin drama celebrates veiled Muslim women

Source: On Islam

Breaking down stereotypes and assumptions about female Muslims in Ireland, a new drama would be staged next year in Dublin to present personal and true stories of successful veiled Muslim women.

“Over 49,000 Muslims now call Ireland home,” Denise Charlton, CEO of the Immigrant Council of Ireland, said in a statement on the council’s website on Monday, November 26.

“They are playing a positive role in our society and are active in every part of Irish life.

The drama, entitled the “Hijabi Monologues”, is planned to be staged on the Axis Theatre in Ballymun, Dublin, next year.

“The aim of this production is to reflect that reality and to breakdown misconceptions which people may have about the Muslim community.”

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October 5, 2012

Plan to build massive new Islamic Centre in Dublin

Source: Irish Central

According to reports in the Irish Times, “a Dublin-based Muslim group with support from many parts of the world has agreed purchase terms for the six-acre site located close to the Gannon-funded Dart station.”

Previous reports in the Irish Times stated that the new development, “could put Ireland in a very favorable position in the Muslim world and lead to significant inward investment.”

The development will include the mosque and support facilities, including a 34-classroom school, conference centre, assembly hall, playground and swimming pool. It has been designed by Paula Gill of architects Conroy Crowe Kelly.

September 30, 2012

Moulana Ghulam Ahmed Rabbani Speech at Google in Dublin Protest

September 30, 2012

Dublin Muslims protest Innocence of Muslims at Google headquarters

Source: Irish Independent

The global backlash against an anti-Islam video spread to the streets of Dublin as hundreds of protesters marched toGoogle‘s European headquarters and demanded the offensive material be taken offline.

The Dublin protests, which passed off quietly to chants of “Islam is peace” and “We love Mohammed”, came days after a lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles calling on Google to take the video down from Google-owned YouTube.

The contentious video has already sparked a wave of protests across the globe; several have been violent, including one that saw the US ambassador to Libya killed.

Speaking outside Google’s Barrow Street HQ, Muslim cleric Alam Ghulam Rabbini of the Irish Sufi Foundation insisted that the protesters were not against freedom of speech but said the video should still be taken down.

“You should not allow these (filmmakers) to use freedom of expression to hurt the feelings of 1.5 billion Muslims around the world,” he said.

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September 30, 2012

Dublin Muslims protest over Innocence of Muslims

Source: Irish Times

The organisers of a Muslim protest march in Dublin against an anti-Islamic video and series of cartoons have described the demonstration as “very successful.”

A group of about 200 to 300 demonstrators participated in a peaceful march from St Stephen’s Green to the American and French embassies.

Earlier this month violent protests erupted across the Middle-East after a video depicting the prophet Muhammad as a fraud went viral on the internet.

Subsequent depictions of Muhammad by a French satirical magazine drew widespread condemnation from across the Muslim world.

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July 13, 2012

Colin Farrell to star in film about Ottoman aide to Ireland during the Irish Famine

There is little known in Ireland about its relationship with Islam and Muslims throughout the years.  Indeed, for many Irishmen (and women), it’s difficult to even figure out where to start analyzing this relationship.  So, let’s begin during the Irish Famine.  In Ireland, it was perhaps the most difficult time in the island’s history.  Half way around the globe in Turkey, the Ottoman Empire was exactly that: an Empire, and one of the most powerful political entities in the entire world.  Little does anyone know that Irishmen (and women) and Turkmen (ditto) during the 1840’s actually had an important and heartwarming relationship:

Turkish Sultan Abdülmecid decided to send 10,000 pounds in aid to Ireland after being informed of how devastating the famine was in Ireland. However, Britain’s Queen Victoria replied, saying they would only accept a thousand pounds in aid. In response, Sultan Abdülmecid secretly sent five ships full of food, as well as cash, to Ireland (Source: Hurriyet Daily News).

To capture this time, a joint Irish-Turkish film producing company is putting together the film ‘Famine’, starring Colin Farrell, about a love story between Fatih, an Ottoman sailor, and Mary, an Irish girl, during the famine.  Below you can read more from the Hurriyet Daily News:

Bringing a little-known aspect of the most traumatic period in Ireland’s history to the silver screen, a new film is set to tell the story of how the Ottoman Empiresent aid to the emerald isle at the outset of the potato famine in 1845.

“Famine” will be shot in both Ireland and Turkey on a $50 million budget and include noted Irish actors like Colin Farrell, as well as several Turkish movie stars.

Shooting on the film is set to start in October, while the movie is expected to be in theaters sometime next year.

Ömer Sarıkaya, the film’s scriptwriter and project manager, said they had signed an initial agreement with the Independent Film Development Corporation (IFDC).

Sarıkaya said that as well as including well-known actors like Saoirse Ronan, Sean Bean and Farrell, renowned Turkish actors Burak Özçivit and Kenan İmirzalıoğlu would also act in the film as well.

The film’s screenplay, which was written by Sarıkaya himself, details a love story between Fatih, an Ottoman sailor, and Mary, an Irish girl, during the famine.

“With the film we aim to shed light on a lesser-known aspect of history. The character Mary will be played by Irishwoman Saoirse Ronan while Fatih and Sultan Abdülmecid will be played by Özçivit and İmirzalıoğlu, respectively,” he said.

It was after taking a trip to Ireland that Sarıkaya said he decided to write the screenplay for the film. Four years ago, while he was preparing to head to Ireland for his trip, Sarıkaya noticed the northwestern city of Drogheda’s coat of arms included a crescent and star. His interest was piqued by an Irish city’s use of a Turkish symbol, and so Sarıkaya set off for the city, which lies 50 kilometers north of Dublin.

“I searched through the archives in Ireland and Turkey, and I visited many libraries to complete the screenplay [on the basis of the Ottoman aid for Ireland during the famine]. I also added the love story of Fatih and Mary,” he said.

Irish Great Famine

The Irish famine first began in 1845 due to blight on Ireland’s main source of food — the potato, and lasted until 1851, resulting in the deaths of a million people and the immigration of more than 2 million citizens. Ultimately, the famine caused Ireland’s population to drop from 8 million to 5 million.

Turkish Sultan Abdülmecid decided to send 10,000 pounds in aid to Ireland after being informed of how devastating the famine was in Ireland. However, Britain’s Queen Victoria replied, saying they would only accept a thousand pounds in aid. In response, Sultan Abdülmecid secretly sent five ships full of food, as well as cash, to Ireland.

Because the ships could not approach Dublin’s port after their long journey, they altered their course, bringing their food instead to Drogheda.

With this generous act the Ottoman Empire gained the appreciation of the local public. The crescent and the star was subsequently adopted as the local football team’s symbol, while a copy of a plaque of appreciation that was given to the Ottoman Empire was hung on the façade of a Drogheda hotel located on the city’s most important avenue.

A letter of gratitude to Sultan Abdülmecid

In addition, Irish noblemen sent a letter of gratitude to Sultan Abdülmecid for the Ottoman ruler’s efforts. The actual letter, which is now located in Topkapı Palace, said, “We, the undersigned Irish noblemen, gentlemen and residents present our gratitude respectfully for the generosity, benevolence and concern and [monetary] donation that is endowed by your majesty to the suffering Irish public to meet the needs of them and appease their sorrows.”

Noting that the historical bond between Ireland and Turkey was unknown, Sarıkaya said the film’s biggest aim was to promote the Ottomans’ tenderness and greatness to the world and to show that Turkish people, the successors of the Ottomans, were not “barbarians or invaders.”

“The film will be in theaters in many countries, particularly in the United States, Turkey and Ireland, and will contribute to Turkey’s promotion to the world,” he said.

He also said he would go to the U.S. to sign the final agreement with the IFDC and that the Irish culture minister had given his full support for the film at a recent meeting in Dublin.

June 16, 2012

Royal Surgeons Dublin trained doctors imprisoned in Bahrain

Source: The Journal

Sinn Féin has urged the Irish government to publicly call for the sentences handed down to nine Bahraini doctors, some of whom trained in Ireland, to be dropped.

In one case Dr Ali Al Akri, an orthopaedic surgeon who trained at the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland (RCSI) in Dublin, was abducted from the operating room at Salmaniya Hospital and reportedly imprisoned and tortured.

His sentence was today cut from 15-years to five years. Eight others, including Irish-trained doctor Bassam Dhaif were given sentences ranging from a month to three years.

The RSCI has expressed its concern at the developments and urged the Bahraini government to release all the medics in light of claims that they were tortured.