Posts tagged ‘Islam in Ireland’

May 29, 2013

U.S. embassy seeks security walls, fears al Qaeda attack at embassy in Dublin

Source: dublin.usembassy.gov

Source: dublin.usembassy.gov

Source: Irish Central

US Embassy officials in Dublin fear an Al Qaeda inspired attack on the compound and have asked for major security improvements in the Ballsbridge, Dublin building.

But the plan for a massive security fence around the US embassy in Dublin has started a row with the city council.

The new defense perimeter proposed by the US government includes a barrier almost 10 feet high and an outer cordon of 3 feet-high steel bollards to protect staff from any possible terrorist attacks.

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May 25, 2013

Ali Selim: Stereotyping all Muslims simply a form of oppression

Ali Salim

Ali Salim

By Ali Salim for Irish Independent

The resurgence of intolerance and discrimination against Muslims after September 11, coupled with related racist tendencies challenging the exercise of fundamental human rights and freedoms of Muslims in some western countries, had no serious impact on Muslims living in Ireland.

When Irish Muslims faced a critical juncture around the time of 9/11, the Irish people made a difference. They expressed their solidarity with Muslims here.

Some visited Muslim organisations and handed over letters of solidarity and others presented flowers. They all passed one message: “This is not you. We are with you.”

Full article

May 9, 2013

New rules for Muslim burials in Ireland

Source: Irish Independent

Muslims will be allowed to bury their dead in the traditional way from next month without the need to seek special permission.

New regulations will facilitate un-coffined burials for Muslims and members of other faiths, unless they’re likely to pose a health and safety risk.

Members of the Islamic faith typically bury their dead as soon as possible, with the deceased wrapped in shrouds, a spokesman for the Islamic Cultural Centre of Ireland said.

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May 3, 2013

Irish residents who’ve died fighting in Syrian Civil War

Source: Irish Times

A Jordanian-born man who grew up in Ireland has been killed fighting with rebel forces in Syria.

The circumstances surrounding the death of Alaa Ciymeh (26) remain unclear given the difficulties of obtaining reliable information from inside the country.

His father, who lives in Dublin, was informed of his son’s death this week. Mourners gathered at the Islamic Cultural Centre of Ireland in Clonskeagh, Dublin, on Wednesday to offer condolences to the family.

The Ciymeh family, who are Palestinian, moved to Ireland when Alaa was very young. He attended the Muslim National School in Clonskeagh, before going on to study at De La Salle College in Churchtown.

Source: Irish Times

Two young volunteers from Ireland have died fighting with Syrian rebels in recent months. There is increasing disquiet, here and in Syria, about the role of young men from abroad in the conflict

The story of how Shamseddin Gaidan’s short life took him from a Navan classroom to an untimely death amid the chaos of Syria’s uprising begins in early 2011. In February that year the Libyan-born schoolboy watched, fascinated, as anti-regime demonstrations inspired by the toppling of dictators in neighbouring Egypt and Tunisia erupted in the country that he and his family had left years before.

Source: Irish Central

Shamseddin Gaidan joined rebels in Syria last year without his parent consent. The circumstances surrounding his death remain unclear. His father Ibrahim, who runs a halal grocery shop in Navan, was informed of his son’s death in a phone call from Syria the Irish Times reports.

“We don’t know where or how he was killed and we don’t know where his body might be,” said Mr Gaidan.

“It is very difficult to get any information. This confusion makes our grief much worse.”

Source: Irish Times

A 22-year-old man from Drogheda who earlier this year joined rebels battling to oust Syrian president Bashar al-Assad has been killed by regime forces in the northern province of Idlib.

Hudhaifa ElSayed was shot dead on Tuesday during a skirmish between rebels and forces loyal to Assad. Syrian state media reported he had been killed but the exact circumstances surrounding his death remain unclear. He was one of an estimated 10-20 men from Ireland who have joined the Syrian uprising as rebels.

Mr ElSayed was born in Egypt but his family moved to Ireland when he was a young boy after his surgeon father, Abdelbaset, secured a job here. He attended St Mary’s diocesan school in Drogheda before working as a coach and trainer. Mr ElSayed, a naturalised Irish citizen, was well-known within the Muslim community for his involvement in youth projects.

He and other men from Ireland joined the Syrian rebels as part of Liwa al-Umma, a brigade founded by a Libyan-Irish man named Mehdi al-Harati, who also commanded a rebel unit during the Libyan revolution last year.

May 3, 2013

Ireland resident dies fighting in Syria

Alaa Ciymeh (26), a Jordanian-born man who grew up in Ireland has been killed fighting with rebel forces in Syria. Source: Irish Times

Alaa Ciymeh (26), a Jordanian-born man who grew up in Ireland has been killed fighting with rebel forces in Syria. Source: Irish Times

Source: Irish Times

A Jordanian-born man who grew up in Ireland has been killed fighting with rebel forces in Syria.

The circumstances surrounding the death of Alaa Ciymeh (26) remain unclear given the difficulties of obtaining reliable information from inside the country.

His father, who lives in Dublin, was informed of his son’s death this week. Mourners gathered at the Islamic Cultural Centre of Ireland in Clonskeagh, Dublin, on Wednesday to offer condolences to the family.

The Ciymeh family, who are Palestinian, moved to Ireland when Alaa was very young. He attended the Muslim National School in Clonskeagh, before going on to study at De La Salle College in Churchtown.

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April 19, 2013

Muslims find a welcoming home in famously Catholic Ireland

By Megan O’Neil for The Atlantic

Perhaps because of its strong religious background, the nation has been more accepting of Islam than many of its European neighbors.

A new 60,000-square-foot development is likely to generate friction in any urban setting, much less a mosque in the capital of a historically Catholic country.

And yet a proposal to construct a multi-use Islamic center — including a three-story domed mosque, school, and fitness facility — in the north Dublin neighborhood of Clongriffin has triggered little of the anti-Muslim blowback surrounding similar projects in other parts of Europe and in the United States.

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April 5, 2013

Irish ‘Hijabi Monologues’ breaks down stereotypes

'Hijabi Monologues' Source: The Journal

‘Hijabi Monologues’ Source: The Journal

Source: The Journal (Ireland)

The experiences of Muslim women in Ireland will be explored when an Irish version of the Hijabi Monologues receives its European premiere in Dublin this month.

The council says the show can break down stereotypes and assumptions around Muslim women in Ireland, with personal and true stories being dramatised. The production is being co-hosted with the ICI, the British Council and axis theatre, Ballymun.

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March 13, 2013

Dublin city council says yes to €40m Islamic cultural centre

Clongriffin mosque

By Jack Fagan in Irish Times

Development work is expected to get under way early next year on an Islamic Cultural Centre including a large mosque at Clongriffin on the northern fringe of Dublin city following the granting of planning permission for the ¤40 million complex by Dublin City Council.

The six-acre campus is being promoted by a Dublin-based Muslim group and will be developed by businessman Gerry Gannon on part of the extensive lands he owns at Clongriffin.

The overall plans prepared by architects Conroy Crowe Kelly provide for a three-storey domed mosque and cultural centre including a prayer hall, meeting rooms, creche and library extending to 5,573sq m (60,000sq ft).

City planners have banned the use of public address announcements or a call to prayer which could be audible outside the centre.

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March 10, 2013

Ireland’s largest mosque in Clongriffin set for construction

Mosque development will cost in the region of €40m Source: RTÉ news

Mosque development will cost in the region of €40m Source: RTÉ news

Source: RTÉ news

Plans for Ireland’s biggest mosque have been given the go-ahead by Dublin City Council for a site in the north of the city.

The six-acre site in Clongriffin will be able to cater for up to 3,000 Muslims during festivals.

One condition of the planning permission is that there is no call to prayer audible outside the complex.

The development will consist of a three-storey domed mosque with minarets, a conference centre, primary and secondary schools and fitness centre with swimming pool.

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Mosque for 3,000 gets go-ahead in capital

Source: Irish Independent

The development, to be built in Clongriffin, north Dublin, will become Ireland’s largest Muslim Cultural Centre catering to the 40,000-strong community living in the capital.

The application to Dublin City Council was submitted by an organisation called the Dublin Welfare Society.

It was approved by planners and will cost a staggering €40m, which is believed to be coming from a backer in the United Arab Emirates.

Clongriffin is a new town on the northern fringe of Dublin city.

It was slated for widescale development at the end of the Celtic Tiger era and while many homes and apartments were built in the area, there are large stretches of wasteland and some ghost estates.

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March 6, 2013

The martyrs of Louth and Meath

Mehdi al-Harati, who formed a brigade in Syria. photographs: Alan Betson and Giulio Petrocco

Mehdi al-Harati, who formed a brigade in Syria. photographs: Alan Betson and Giulio Petrocco

Source: Irish Times

Two young volunteers from Ireland have died fighting with Syrian rebels in recent months. There is increasing disquiet, here and in Syria, about the role of young men from abroad in the conflict

The story of how Shamseddin Gaidan’s short life took him from a Navan classroom to an untimely death amid the chaos of Syria’s uprising begins in early 2011. In February that year the Libyan-born schoolboy watched, fascinated, as anti-regime demonstrations inspired by the toppling of dictators in neighbouring Egypt and Tunisia erupted in the country that he and his family had left years before.

Continue reading